Blackouts, Bob Dylan, & Life in the Poconos

Considering we’re only 60 miles away FROM New York City, we’re pretty fortunate to have not lost power… but then again we ALWAYS go without lights during every thunderstorm.

Today on the Pocono Record: Bill Doolittle recalls the Blackout of 1965 in NYC. Pretty cool stuff, as he had to share his space with the staff of The New York Times.

I was only two or three months old during that Blackout… so I don’t remember much. I do remember Bushwick turning INTO a war-zone in 1977. That sucked.

If the name Bill Doolittle sounds familiar, yes, you may know his brother Jerome Doolittle of BAD ATTITUDES fame, who has become quite the blogging superstar as of late. Constantly referenced on such illuminati sites as Mykeru.Com and .:Chapel-Perilous:.. I guess because Jerome covered the Vietnam War first-hand, you can assume he knows a little something about war, journalism, and politics. Ya think?

I have the honor of working with Bill, and his daughter, Erin. Wonderful people & great journalists.

The Bob Dylan concert is in progress down the block. Too bad Carole has a “confidentiality clause” in her contract or I’d have some STORIES to tell YOU!

what.a.fucking.loon.

I’m sorry, did I say that out loud?

9 thoughts on “Blackouts, Bob Dylan, & Life in the Poconos

  1. Yes, I think you said fucking! What the hell? 😉

    I remeber after hurricane Gilbert here, September 1988, we had no electricity on our road for almost 30 days after! Needless to say we had to invest in a generator….and don’t ask who had to suck the gas to keep it going!

    Life without electricity is indeed dark!

  2. Life without electricity is marvelous! You learn to look at the sky, rediscover community and talk by the dinner table, and remember that your self-worth does not depend on HAVING another car or looking like an airbrushed model.
    And yes, I remember seeing Dylan at a concert, and man was that disappointing!

  3. I saw Dylan in Wilkes-Barre last year. I still couldn’t figure out the big whoop. The audience was entertaining though. Well, most particularly the whole family that sat in the front row (I was in the 2nd row)… There were 3 generations of this family, they were at a gazillion Dylan concerts that year. And they all danced the same way, in this herky-jerky fashion with one hand up in the air.

  4. Busy Mom and I are on the same track….I thought for a moment you were going to tell us that YOU were the product of that last one….

  5. For someone who writes some pretty amazing songs when sung by anyone other than himself…. I mean really. Go with what you’re good at. The man can compose. He just can’t sing worth shit. He can barely speak. I always wonder what a conversation between Dylan and Ozzie would sound like!

    As for the great Blackout of 2003 – I lost power for all of 4 hours, so I can’t really complain at all. While most everyone I know in the area sweat buckets while they tried to sleep in the heat and humidity, and had to throw out freezers and fridges full of food, Mike and I drank cold beer and wine and slept in air conditioned comfort. *shrug* Oops.

  6. the power went out for like 15 minutes a year and a half ago, and i nearly went mad. fortunately it came back on before i could go totally all entirely full-on whackawhacka yibbity yibbity, y’know? *twitch* see? fine.

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